Field Applied Hazard Markings

By: JADE Learning | Jan 30, 2015

Now that 2015 is here, many jurisdictions that postponed the adoption of the 2014 NEC until January, 2015, are enforcing the new code changes. One of the new changes is 110.21(B) which requires the proper use of field applied hazard markings.

Section 110.21(B) states that if caution, warning, danger signs or labels are required by the NEC, the labels shall “adequately” warn of the hazard using effective words and/or colors and/or symbols. It will be up to the AHJ to determine if any such labels required by Code and installed by the electrician “adequately” warn of the hazard.

The informational note, referencing ANSI Z535.4-2011, Product Safety Signs and Labels, is not a Code requirement but it’s likely that many jurisdictions will use the standard in order to enforce the Code requirement. The Product Safety Signs and Labels standard is available for $109.00 online.

Below are a few highlights from the ANSI standard:

Wording on hazard labels should use Sans Serif type fonts (no curly Qs).

DANGER indicates a hazardous situation that, if not avoided, will result in death or serious injury.  The word DANGER shall be in safety white letters on a safety red background.

Danger Sign
The word DANGER shall be in safety white letters on a safety red background.

WARNING indicates a hazardous situation that, if not avoided, could result in death or serious injury.  The word WARNING shall be in safety black letters on a safety orange background.

Warning Sign
The word WARNING shall be in safety black letters on a safety orange background.

 

 

 

 

 

 

CAUTION indicates a hazardous situation that, if not avoided, could result in minor or moderate injury.  The word CAUTION shall be in safety black letters on a safety yellow background.

Caution Sign
The word CAUTION shall be in safety black letters on a safety yellow background.

 

 

 

 

 

Here is a list of the more common Code sections where the new labeling is required:

110.16 Arc-Flash Hazard Warning. Try and use labels that come with the equipment since the manufacturer will most likely be producing equipment that complies with the newest standards.

110.22 Series Rated systems. Series rating labels are usually provided by the manufacturer but the NEC requires that the electrician fill in a portion of the label in the field. These types of labels are often thrown away along with other documentation that comes with a new electric panel. They are required for series rated systems.

312.8 Feed-through conductors. Panelboards are permitted to have conductors passing through that do not originate within the panelboard. If this is so, be ready to label the panel to identify the closest disconnecting means for any feed-through conductors.

392.18(H) Cable trays containing conductors over 600 volts must be labeled every 10 foot. This label will most likely be provided by the installing electrician.

408.3(F)(1) If the panelboard is supplied by an electrical system with a high-leg, the enclosure must be labeled as to which phase has the higher voltage to ground.

690.5(C), 690.7(E), 690.10(C), 690.17(E), 690.35(F), 690.56(B). There are many labels in a PV system that must comply with 110.21(B).

700.7(B), 701.7(B), 702.7(B). Non-separately derived systems, such as stand-by generators, use the grounded conductor in the service equipment as a ground-fault return path. A label is required at the service to identify the danger of interrupting that return path.

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