Electrical Safety Never Takes A Holiday

May is designated as Electrical Safety Month and many organizations and employers take advantage of the focus on electrical safety to emphasize the importance of following safe working practices when working around energized equipment. The month of May is fast passing and the Memorial Day holiday is approaching, but we must never allow our electrical safe working practices to take a holiday, not even a day off. Day in and day out the hazards associated with working around energized electrical equipment remain present. Those hazards never take a holiday, so neither can our electrical safety procedures. Designating May as Electrical Safety month is a good reminder, but electrical safety is important all year long.

A panelboard destroyed by an arc-flash event. (Not the one at the bowling alley).

An example is provided by a report of an electrical fire in a bowling alley. An untrained person was tasked with installing some filler blanks where circuit breakers were missing in a panelboard. A simple task that certainly needed to be done; if the filler blanks are not installed, the energized bus bars are exposed. What can go wrong? We all know the answer. A lot! Apparently, while installing the filler blanks a short circuit was created across the bus bars resulting in an arc flash. Fortunately, no serious injury resulted, but the panelboard was destroyed. The bowling alley was out of business for several days until the electrical system was repaired, so employees likely lost a few days wages as well. It could have been much worse.

The 2017 NEC includes many reminders to help us remember the importance of following safe work practices. Signage requirements in 110.16 are intended to WARN qualified persons of potential arc flash hazards. Article 690 requires numerous WARNING signs to remind us of the hazards specific to PV systems including new signage requirements for Rapid Shutdown systems. The entrance to rooms or enclosures containing equipment operating at over 1000 volts are required to be kept locked and marked with conspicuous DANGER-HIGH VOLTAGE-KEEP OUT signs to inform both qualified and unqualified persons of the hazard. These and the numerous other CAUTION, WARNING and DANGER signs required by the NEC are intended to provide that final opportunity to remember and follow safe working practices.

PV System Warning Sign required by 690.13

PV System Warning Sign required by 690.13

But, human nature often chooses an easier path. Even qualified persons are sometimes tempted to take shortcuts, but what makes a person qualified to work around energized electrical equipment in the first place? Experience? Training? Time?

The Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace (NFPA 70E) defines a qualified person as, “One who has demonstrated skills and knowledge related to the construction and operation of electrical equipment and installations and has received safety training to identify and avoid the hazards involved.” Obviously, the employee in the bowling alley was not able to identify and avoid the hazards involved.

Training is only part of the equation; an employee must demonstrate that the training had the desired effect by following safe working practices. The employee’s supervisor has a key role in verifying that the employee is applying what was learned in the classroom to real world situations. Was he or she paying attention during training, or were they sending text messages or thinking about their next work task? When did employees performing electrical work last receive training?

NFPA 70E requires retraining in safety-related work practices at least every three years. Three years is a long time. Even the most qualified person can develop bad habits, and we all need reminding from time to time. That is, after all, what all those warning signs in the NEC are about. What about unqualified persons? By definition, a qualified person is one who has received training and demonstrated the necessary skills. Does an unqualified person require training?

An unqualified person is still required by NFPA 70E to be “trained in, and be familiar with, any electrical safety-related practices necessary for their safety.”  Virtually any maintenance technician is exposed to some level of electrical hazard and should receive the training necessary to avoid those hazards. As demonstrated by the employee in the bowling alley, unqualified persons should never be permitted to work on energized electrical equipment.

Jade Learning provides on-site Electrical Safety Training based on NFPA 70E. Visit us online or contact us at 1-800-443-5233 for a quote. Some of our online continuing education courses also include an electrical safety component. May is a good reminder, but remember that electrical safety should never take a holiday.

Posted in 2017 NEC, 70E, Electrical Safety, Marking and Labeling, Photovoltaics Tagged with: , , ,

Article 90: Simple But Important Changes

When reading a book, how often do we skip past the introduction and start with the chapters that interest us? That happens to those of us that use the NEC as well, but understanding the introduction to the code in Article 90 is key to properly applying the technical requirements in the other chapters of the NEC. Changes in the Introduction may appear simple, but simple does not mean unimportant.

One thing that has not changed is the purpose of the NEC under 90.1. The stated purpose remains,  “the practical safeguarding of persons and property from the hazards arising from the use of electricity.”

An exhaust fan was removed, but the NM cable was not terminated in a box as required by 300.15.

There are limits to what any code or standard can do in protecting human beings from our own mistakes, but as we look at the changes that have been introduced this year in Article 90 and elsewhere in the NEC, we should keep in mind the purpose of the Code: the practical safeguarding of persons and property from electrical hazards. Fires, explosions, and electric shock continue to take lives and destroy property each year; as we study the changes in the 2017 we should think about the link between the change and the stated purpose of the NEC.

One such change appears in 90.2. Previous editions of the NEC stated that, “This Code covers the installation of electrical conductors, equipment, and raceways;” However, the requirements that apply when conductors or equipment are removed have sometimes been overlooked. For example, 590.2(D) requires the removal of temporary wiring upon completion of construction, 390.8 requires removal of circuit conductors in underfloor raceways when outlets are abandoned, and 110.12 requires unused openings in electrical equipment to be closed. Section 725.25 and requires the accessible portion of abandoned Class 2 and Class 3 cables to be removed while 800.25 requires the same for abandoned communications cables. In the 2017 NEC, 90.2 states that the code covers, “the installation and removal,” of electrical conductors, equipment and raceways.

The 2017 NEC covers the installation and removal of electrical conductors, equipment, and raceways.

The point of the change is that the removal of electrical conductors, equipment, and raceways be done in such a manner that the electrical system remains in compliance with the safety requirements of the NEC. Since the NEC is adopted by many states and local jurisdictions for regulatory purposes, clarifying that the code applies to both the installation and removal of conductors and equipment reinforces the importance that electrical work be performed by qualified persons and in compliance with the NEC regardless of whether the work involves the installation or removal of electrical conductors, equipment or raceways.

Another significant change is found in 90.3 Code Arrangement. For many years, the accepted arrangement was that Chapters 1-4 applied generally and Chapters 5, 6, and 7 applied to special occupancies, special equipment, or other special conditions. It was accepted that Chapters 5, 6, or 7 could modify the general requirements in Chapters 1-4. While this is true, in fact the requirements of Chapters 5, 6, and  7 may “supplement or modify” requirements within any of the 7 chapters- not just Chapters 1-4.

For example, an electric sign installed within a fountain must comply with the specific provisions found in 680.57, which modify the basic requirements for electric signs in Article 600. The disconnecting means for the sign must comply with both the sign disconnect requirements in 600.6 and the pool maintenance disconnecting means required by 680.13. Since Article 680 is written to address the specific hazards associated with electrical equipment around swimming pools and fountains, it is logical that the more specific requirements in Article 680 will supplement of modify the general requirements for signs in Article 600 just as Article 600 supplements or modifies the general requirements in Chapters 1-4.

Sign in fountain

The changes in 90.3, Code Arrangement, make it clear that the NEC is a comprehensive document. As we study the 2017 NEC changes, we cannot just pick out individual sections to apply independently of related requirements in other chapters. As stated in 90.1(B), compliance with the NEC and proper maintenance will result in an “installation that is essentially free from hazard.” The practical safeguarding of persons and property from electrical hazards should be our goal for every electrical installation. Jade Learning offers courses on the 2017 NEC changes as well as exam prep courses to help you learn your way through the NEC. Power your career by registering for a free account!

 

Posted in 2017 NEC, Conductors, Electrical Safety, Equipment, Pools and Spas, Wiring Tagged with: , , , , , , , ,

Feeder Conductor Ampacity

Feeders Part 3

Feeder Conductor Ampacity.

The conditions of use must be considered when determining the minimum size of a feeder conductor. A continuous load, such as the lighting load in a store building, generates heat in the feeder conductor that must be compensated for. Ambient temperatures above 86oF or more than 3 current-carrying conductors in a raceway or cable can have a similar heating effect.

215.2 Feeder with Scales

The conductor size required to serve the noncontinuous load plus 125% of the continuous load is compared to the conductor size required to compensate for ambient temperature and or more than 3 current-carrying conductors in a raceway. The larger size conductor must be used.

According to 215.2(A)(1) in the 2014 NEC the ampacity of feeder conductors must not be less than the ampacity required for the greater of (A) or (B) below:

(A)        100% of the noncontinuous load plus 125% of any continuous loads.

OR

(B)        100% of the maximum load served after the application of any ampacity adjustment or temperature correction factors.

The ampacity of the feeder conductors is also limited by the temperature rating of the circuit breaker or panelboard terminals as covered in 110.14(C). Equipment terminals for circuits rated over 100 amps will be rated at 750C. Higher temperature rated conductors are permitted to be used on these terminals, but the ampacity of the conductor used is limited to no more than the 750C ampacity in Table 310.15(B)(16) for the same size conductor.

For example, a 208Y/120 volt 4-wire 3-phase feeder supplies 100 amps of continuous nonlinear lighting load and 50 amps of noncontinuous load for general purpose receptacles in a retail store. All terminals and conductors are rated 75oC.

First, find the ampacity of the conductor needed to satisfy 125% of the continuous load plus 100% of the noncontinuous load.

100 Amps continuous X 125% = 125 Amps.

125 Amps + 50 Amps noncontinuous = 175 Amp conductor.

In the 75oC column of Table 310.15(B)(16), a 2/0 AWG THWN copper conductor has an allowable ampacity of 175 amps so this conductor meets the minimum required ampacity for the noncontinuous load plus 125% of the continuous load.

The conductor ampacity in Table 310.15(B)(16) is based on an ambient temperature of 86oF and not more than 3 current-carrying conductors in a raceway. If there are more than 3 current-carrying conductors in a raceway or cable, the ampacity of the conductor must be adjusted.

Ampacity adjustment

Where there are more than 3 current-carrying conductors in a raceway or cable, the ampacity of the conductor must be adjusted to prevent damage to conductor insulation caused by overheating.

Since the 208Y/120-volt, 4-wire feeder supplies nonlinear lighting loads, the neutral must be counted as a current carrying conductor per 310.15(B)(5). This means that there are 4 current-carrying conductors in the same raceway. The adjustment factor in Table 310.15(B)(3)(a) for 4-6 current-carrying conductors in the same raceway or cable is 80% or 0.80. The fastest way to find a conductor that will meet the adjusted ampacity requirement is to divide the load served by the adjustment factor (0.80). It is not required to multiply the continuous load by 125% before applying the adjustment factors in Table 310.15(B)(3)(a).

Load served = 100 Amps continuous + 50 Amps noncontinuous = 150 Amps.

150 Amps ÷ 0.80 = 187.5 Amps (Round up to 188 Amps).

In the 75oC column of Table 310.15(B)(16) a 3/0 THWN copper conductor has an allowable ampacity of 200 amps. To double check that this conductor is sufficient for the load served, multiply the conductor ampacity by the 80% adjustment factor (0.80) in Table 310.15(B)(3)(a).

200 Amps (From Table) X 0.80 adjustment factor = 160 Amps adjusted ampacity.

Load served = 100 Amps continuous + 50 Amps noncontinuous = 150 amps.

The adjusted ampacity of a 3/0 THWN copper conductor is adequate for the maximum load served. Since the ampacity adjustment resulted in a conductor larger than the 2/0 AWG THWN conductor required for the noncontinuous load plus 125% of the continuous load, the larger 3/0 THWN copper conductor must be used.

Adjustment factors for more than 3 current-carrying conductors in a raceway or cable also apply where single conductors or multiconductor cables are bundled together for more than 24 inches in length. Although not discussed in this article, conductor ampacity must also be adjusted for ambient temperatures other than 86oF. Ambient temperature correction factors are found in Table 310.15(B)(2)(a).

To learn more about the allowable ampacity of conductors and the NEC, register for one of our on-line courses at jadelearning.com or you can power your career to the next level by signing up for one of our exam prep courses!

Posted in 2014 NEC, Ampacity, Cables and Raceways, Calculations, Conductors, Electrical Exam Prep, Feeders, Inspection, Wiring Tagged with: , , , , ,

Feeders Part 2: Overcurrent Protection

The general rule in 215.3 is that a feeder overcurrent device shall have a rating not less than the noncontinuous load plus 125% of any continuous loads supplied by the feeder. Unless permitted for specific applications, such as motor circuits, the rating of the feeder overcurrent device is selected as close as practical to the allowable ampacity of the conductor. This allows the overcurrent device to protect the conductor from overheating due to overloads, as well as from ground-faults and short-circuits. However, the allowable ampacity of a conductor will seldom exactly match one of the standard ratings for fuses or inverse time circuit breakers in 240.6.

feeder-overcurrent-protection-blog-2-options-revised-2

Conductors must be protected against overcurrent in accordance with 240.4.


 

For example, the allowable ampacity of a 500 kcmil THWN aluminum conductor in Table 310.15(B)(16) is 310 amps. The ampacity of the conductor falls in between the standard overcurrent device ratings of 300 amps and 350 amps in section 240.6. Section 240.4(B) allows the next higher standard overcurrent device rating to be used as long as the standard rating does not exceed 800 amps. So, a 350-amp overcurrent device can be used to protect the conductor provided the noncontinuous load plus 125% of the continuous load does not exceed the conductor ampacity of 310 amps.

With large feeders where conductors are often connected in parallel, selecting the rating for the feeder overcurrent device is not as simple. Assuming there are not more than 3 current-carrying conductors in a raceway and the ambient temperature is 86oF (30oC), the allowable ampacity of three 500 kcmil THWN aluminum conductors connected in parallel is, 310 amps X 3 = 930 amps. The ampacity of the feeder conductors falls between the standard overcurrent device ratings of 800 amps and 1000 amps in 240.6. The next higher rating (1000 amps) cannot be used to protect the conductors because it is over the 800-amp limit set in 240.4(B), but an 800-amp rated overcurrent device may not be large enough for the load served.

For example, if the feeder supplies 400 amperes of continuous load and 400 amperes of noncontinuous load, the feeder overcurrent device must be rated not less than the 400 amps of noncontinuous load plus 125% of the 400 amps of continuous load.

400 amps of continuous load X 125% = 500 amps

500 amps + 400 amps noncontinuous load = 900 amps

A minimum overcurrent device rating of 900 amps is required, but 900 amps is not one of the standard ratings listed in 240.6.

What are the options?

1.One option is to change to a conductor with an allowable ampacity of at least 1000 amps and use a standard 1000-amp overcurrent device.  The allowable ampacity of a 600 kcmil THWN aluminum conductor in Table 310.15(B)(16) is 340 amps. The ampacity of three 600 kcmil conductors in parallel is 340 amps X 3 = 1020 amps. A 1000-amp rated overcurrent device can now be used to protect the feeder.

2. A second option is to use a nonstandard rated fuse or inverse time circuit breaker rated not less than the 900 amps required for the overcurrent device and not more than the 930 amps allowed by the conductor ampacity. Section 240.6 specifically permits the use of fuses or inverse time circuit breakers with nonstandard ampere ratings, but fuses or circuit breakers with non-standard ratings may not be readily available.

non-standard-rated-overcurrent-devices

900 amps is not a standard rating for an overcurrent device.


3. Exception No.1 to 215.3 offers a third option that would allow an 800-amp overcurrent device to be used at 100% of its rating, but only if the entire assembly including the overcurrent device(s) protecting the feeder(s) is listed for operation at 100% of its rating. Standard overcurrent devices, panelboards and switchgear are not listed for operation at 100% of their nameplate rating so this would likely require special ordering the equipment.

Any one of the three options above provide an acceptable level of overcurrent protection for general applications. Selecting an overcurrent protective device for specific conductor applications, such as a motor feeder, is a topic for another day. Power your career by learning more about overcurrent protection and the electrical code at JadeLearning.com.

Posted in 2014 NEC, Ampacity, Calculations, Conductors, Electrical Exam Prep, Feeders, Wiring Tagged with: , , , , ,

Feeders Part 1: What is a Feeder?

Author: Dennis Bordeaux

Illustration: Ivan Torres

In order to understand what a feeder is, it is best to start with what a feeder is not.

The conductors between the utility service point and the service disconnecting means are service conductors, not feeder conductors. Special service conductor rules apply because these conductors do not have short-circuit or ground-fault protection other than what is provided on the primary side of the utility transformer. Service conductors are not feeders.

Branch circuits are not feeders. A branch circuit is defined as, the circuit conductors between the final overcurrent device protecting the circuit and the outlet(s). Even the conductors for a circuit rated at 1000-amps is a branch circuit if the conductors are on the load side of the final branch circuit overcurrent device. The conductors on the load side of the final branch circuit overcurrent device are branch circuit conductors, not feeder conductors, no matter how large the circuit rating.

So, feeder conductors are conductors that are not service conductors and not branch circuit conductors. All circuit conductors between the load side of the service equipment and the line side of the final branch circuit overcurrent device are feeder conductors. The definition of a feeder also includes the conductors from the source of a separately derived system or other non-utility power supply source and the final branch circuit overcurrent device.

A Type SER cable between a 200-amp residential service disconnect and a subpanel is a feeder. The conductors between an 800-amp circuit breaker and a fused branch circuit disconnect supplying a single motor are also feeder conductors. So are the conductors between a standby generator and an emergency transfer switch. Although the overcurrent protection rules  for these different feeders vary depending on the load(s) supplied, overcurrent protection is typically provided at the supply end of the feeder.

The conductors between the secondary side of a 480-volt/208-volt transformer and the secondary-side overcurrent device are feeder conductors as well, but are not considered to be protected by the transformer circuit primary overcurrent device.

feeders-part1

Circuit conductors between the service point and the final branch-circuit overcurrent device.

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­______________

 

Prior to the installation of feeder conductors, the authority having jurisdiction may require a feeder diagram. A feeder diagram should include the total calculated load on the feeder and any demand factors used in sizing the feeder conductors. The size and type of feeder conductors, as well as the rating of the feeder overcurrent protective devices, should also be included with the feeder diagram.

A typical electrical system may have many types of feeders supplying many different types of loads. Feeders supplying a combination of continuous and noncontinuous loads, motor feeders, outside feeders or feeders to separate buildings are often included on a feeder diagram. In many cases there may be feeders from more than one voltage system on the same premises. DC system feeders may also be present.

riser-diagram-feeders-part-1

   A typical feeder diagram.

________________

 

Where feeders supplied from different voltage systems are present, each ungrounded conductor must be identified by phase or line and system at all termination, connection, and splice points. Identification of ungrounded AC system conductors may be by color coding, marking tape, tagging, or other approved means. Ungrounded feeder conductors supplied by a DC system must be identified by one of the methods listed in 215.12(C)(2). The color red is permitted to be used to identify an ungrounded positive polarity conductor and the color black is permitted to identify an ungrounded negative polarity conductor.

feeders-part-1-dc-identification

215.12(C)(2) Direct-Current Feeder Identification Methods.

With the exception of high-leg systems and isolated power systems, the NEC does not require specific colors to identify ungrounded AC conductors. The NEC mandates the use of the color orange to identify the high-leg of a 4-wire delta-connected system where the mid-point of one phase winding is grounded (110.15). If a high-leg system is present on the same premises with a 480-volt system, the common practice of identifying 480-volt feeder conductors using the colors brown, orange, and yellow may need to be adjusted. Marking tape, tagging or other approved means of feeder identification may be required to distinguish the different feeder voltages.

js-12

Typical 480-Volt AC Feeder Identification

Grounded feeder conductors if present, including grounded DC system conductors, must be identified in accordance with 200.6. Where grounded conductors of different voltage systems are installed in the same enclosure or raceway, each grounded conductor must be identified by system.

The feeder identification method used is required to be posted at each feeder panelboard or documented and readily available to those who will service the electrical system. Using a standard feeder identification method throughout the premises wiring system allows a qualified person to quickly identify the phase and voltage of the feeder conductors at all termination or splice points after the installation is completed.

Want to know more? Log into your JADE Learning account or register a free account and begin taking online electrical classes to satisfy you continuing education hours.

 

 

 

Posted in 2014 NEC, Conductor Identification, Conductors, Equipment, Feeders, Marking and Labeling Tagged with: , , , , , , , ,

Utah License Renewal: Electricians Renew in November!

The 16 Hour Renewal Package for Utah is online for all Utah licensed electricians to take for their Utah continuing education requirement. Utah electricians are required to have all 16 hours of electrical continuing education reported to the Utah Division of Occupational & Professional Licensing (DOPL) by November 30, 2016.

continuing education Utah

Sign up for the 16 Hour Renewal Package for Utah

Utah electrical licensees are required to have a total of 16 hours of Utah electrical continuing education each renewal cycle. Twelve of the 16 hours have to be Core credit, and the remaining four hours can be Professional credit. Another option available to satisfy Utah electrical continuing education requirements is for all 16 hours to be taken as Core credit.

The 16 Hour Renewal Package for Utah electricians expires on November 15, 2016. To take advantage of the discounted package price, Utah licensed electricians will need to complete and pay for the 16 hour renewal package before November 15, 2016. The courses in the Utah electrical continuing education package include:

Code Calculations (2014 NEC) will cover single family and multi-family dwelling calculations like lighting loads and general loads. Overcurrent Protection (2014 NEC) will discuss key sections of Article 240 which includes overcurrent protection for panelboards, motors, and appliances. Residential Wiring (2014 NEC) covers the requirements in the 2014 NEC for installing electrical systems in dwelling units. These three electrical continuing education courses will give you the 16 hours that you need for Utah license renewal.

Utah license renewal

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Follow these 3 easy steps for Utah license renewal by November 30th, 2016:

Step 1: Complete Online Electrical Continuing Education.

Complete the 16 Hour Renewal Package for Utah online at any time day or night and on any device. The JADE Learning electrical continuing education courses can be completed on a laptop, smartphone, computer, or a tablet. To satisfy your Utah electrical continuing education requirements log in to your JADE Learning account or register a free account. The Utah electrical license renewal package is discounted at $169 until November 15, 2016. To receive the discounted price, complete and then pay for the three package courses at the same time. 

Step 2: Check CE Hours.

Wait for the electrical continuing education hours to be reported to the Utah Division of Professional Licensing. JADE Learning will report continuing education hours to the state online through the DOPL reporting website. Email notifications will be sent by JADE Learning to licensees once the hours have been reported to Utah DOPL. The reported continuing education hours should post to Utah’s DOPL site within a few days. 

Renew License Utah

Renew your Utah electrical license now.

Step 3: Renew Electrical License.

Submit the Utah license renewal form and fee online. The required fee to renew an active Utah electrical license is $63. Make sure to renew by the November 30th, 2016, deadline to keep an active electrical license. Check the status of an electrical license on the Utah DOPL license lookup webpage.

Get started today! You can log in to your JADE Learning account or register a free account and begin taking online electrical courses to fulfill your Utah electrical continuing education requirements.

Posted in 2014 NEC, Electrical Licensing, State Requirements Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

210.23(A)(1)&(2) Permissible Loads, Multiple-Outlet Branch Circuits.

Author:  Dennis Bordeaux

Illustration:  Ivan Torres

A multiple-outlet branch circuit is a branch circuit that supplies two or more outlets. With the exception of the required small appliance, laundry, and bathroom receptacle circuits in dwelling units, those outlets may be a combination of lighting outlets for luminaires, receptacle outlets for cord and plug connected utilization equipment not fastened in place (portable appliances) and or outlets supplying utilization equipment that is fastened in place. The load on the branch circuit is never permitted to exceed the ampere rating of the branch circuit, but simply adding up the nameplate rating of the utilization equipment does not guarantee code compliance.

The rating of any one cord-and-plug connected utilization equipment which is not fastened in place cannot be more than 80% of the branch-circuit rating. For example, a cord and plug connected commercial coffee maker is connected to a receptacle on a multiple-outlet 20 amp branch circuit. Since the coffee maker is not fastened in place it can be rated up to 80% of the branch circuit, or 16 amps.

The total rating of all utilization equipment that is fastened in place (other than luminaires) is not permitted to exceed 50% of the rating of a branch circuit that also supplies lighting and or receptacle outlets for other loads. In other words, the load for the utilization equipment that is fastened in place is limited to a maximum of 10 amps on a 20-amp rated branch circuit supplying a combination of lighting and or receptacle outlets for portable appliances. It is easy to exceed this limitation.

Permissible loads

210.23(A)(1)&(2) Permissible Loads, Multiple-Outlet Branch Circuits.

For example, a 120-volt, 20-amp branch circuit in an employee breakroom supplies a wall mounted water cooler with a nameplate rating of 3 amps, a fastened in place ice machine rated at 8 amps, and a duplex receptacle for a portable microwave. The total rating of the equipment that is fastened in place is 11 amps (3A + 8A = 11A). This exceeds 50% of the rating of the branch circuit. At least one of the loads needs to be connected to a different branch circuit.

In this example, a simple solution would be to connect the duplex receptacle for the portable microwave to a different branch circuit. The 50% limitation only applies if the branch circuit supplies a combination of utilization equipment fastened in place plus lighting outlets and/or receptacles for cord-and-plug equipment that are not fastened in place. Since both the water cooler and the ice machine are fastened in place, the connected load on the 20-amp branch-circuit is not limited to 10 amps if no other outlets are connected to the branch circuit.

Learn more about permissible loads today! Log into your JADE Learning account or register a free account and begin taking online electrical classes to satisfy you continuing education hours.

Posted in 2014 NEC, Ampacity, Branch Circuits, Calculations, Equipment, Wiring Tagged with: , , , ,

How to Get CE Credits: Best Continuing Education to Renew Your Oregon Electric License

Oregon General Supervising Electricians (S) and Limited Supervising Electricians (PS) have a 24-hour Oregon electrical continuing education requirement that has to be satisfied by Saturday, October 1st, 2016. The state of Oregon Building Codes Division requires the 24 hours of Oregon electrical continuing education hours to cover 12 hours of Code Change, 4 hours of Oregon Rule and Law (OESC), and the last 8 hours can be Code Related or Code Change.

Oregon electrician license renewal

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The best continuing education for Oregon General Supervising Electricians and Limited Supervising Electricians is presented by JADE Learning. The 24 Hour Renewal Package for S and PS Licensees includes:

The Oregon Supervising Electrical license renewal package is discounted at $219 until September 21st, 2016. To receive the discounted price, the package needs to be completed and paid for by September 21st, 2016.

Oregon Electrical CE Class

Earn your CE hours with the Oregon 24 Hour Renewal Package

3 easy steps to renew your Oregon electrical supervising license:

Step 1: Complete JADE Learning’s 24 Hour CE Package.

Complete the 24 Hour Renewal Package for S and PS Licensees online, at any time. Continuing education provider JADE Learning offers courses that can be completed using a smartphone, tablet, laptop, or computer. You can work on the courses at your own pace – log in and out at any time, and your work will be saved. You can register a free account or log in to your JADE Learning account any time – day or night. After you complete all four courses in the package, pay for them altogether at the end to receive the $50 package discount. The package deal expires on September 21st, 2016, so the courses have to be completed and paid for by then to receive the discount.

Step 2: Check the state of Oregon Building Codes Division Electrical CE Hours.

Your Oregon electrical continuing education hours will be submitted to the board every business day. JADE Learning typically reports to the Oregon Building Codes Division (BCD) two times per week, but when there is a deadline approaching, JADE Learning reports hours to Oregon every business day. After the hours have been reported, JADE Learning sends an email notification alerting you that your hours have been submitted to the Oregon BCD. You can check online to see that your hours have posted on the state of Oregon Building Codes Division License Holder Search webpage.

Step 3: Renew Oregon Electrician License Online.

Oregon Electrical CE Classes

Take your Oregon electrical CE hours now, so you will have time to explore the outdoors this fall.

You are ready to renew once all of your hours have posted to the Oregon BCD website. You can submit your Oregon Supervising Electrician license renewal online. The cost to renew an Oregon Supervising Electrician license is $100. Make sure you renew your Oregon electric license by October 1st, 2016, to keep an active supervising license.

Get started now! You can log in to your JADE Learning account or register a free account and fulfill your Oregon electrical continuing education requirements with the best electrical continuing education classes!

Posted in 2014 NEC, Electrical Licensing, JADE Learning Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Renew your Florida Electrical Contractors License in 3 Easy Steps with Online CE Classes

Florida Mailer

Earn your hours with the Florida 14 hour package

JADE Learning is offering the 14 Hour Renewal Package for Florida Electrical Contractors online for the August 31st, 2016 renewal deadline. All licensed electrical contractors in Florida are required to complete 14 hours of continuing education to renew a Florida electrical contractor license.

ECLB Florida is requiring an additional 1 hour Florida Laws and Rules course to be included in the 14 hours of continuing education for Florida. The 14 hours of Florida electrical continuing education must consist of 7 hours technical, 1 hour laws and rules, 1 hour workers’ compensation, 1 hour business practices, 1 hour workplace safety, 1 hour Florida building advanced module, and the last 2 hours can be on any of the categories above and will count as 2 hours general credit to renew a Florida electrical contractor license. Two hours of false alarm prevention is required for all alarm contractors and electrical contractors who engage in alarm work. Take the best continuing education package with JADE Learning that includes all of the required courses as well as the new Laws and Rules requirement.

The following Florida CE class packages are available to take online at any time:

14 Hour Renewal Package for Florida Electrical Contractors

  • Residential Wiring (2014 NEC) (7-hours Technical)
  • Florida Business Statutes (1-hour Business)
  • Installation Checklists (2-hours Technical)
  • Florida Laws and Rules (1-hour Laws/Rules)
  • OSHA Electrical Safety Work Practices (1-hour Safety)
  • 2014 Utility-Interactive PV Systems (1-hour Advanced)
  • Workers Compensation-2016 (1-hour Workers’ Compensation)

14 Hour Alarm Renewal Package for Florida

  • Residential Wiring (2014 NEC) (7-hours Technical)
  • Florida Business Statutes (1-hour Business)
  • False Alarm Awareness (2-hours False Alarm)
  • Florida Laws and Rules (1-hour Laws/Rules)
  • OSHA Electrical Safety Work Practices (1-hour Safety)
  • 2014 Utility-Interactive PV Systems (1-hour Advanced)
  • Workers Compensation-2016 (1-hour Workers’ Compensation). 

 

Follow these 3 easy steps to renew your Florida Electrical Contractors license:

laptop with JADE Learning

You can access www.Jade1.com from any device

Step 1: Complete Online CE Class.

Complete the 14 Hour Renewal Package for Florida Electrical Contractors online at any time and on any device. The JADE Learning classes can be finished using a computer, laptop, tablet, or smartphone. You can access your JADE Learning account or register a free account at any time, day or night and work on the courses over the next few weeks or take the courses back-to-back in 14 hours. You will be presented with the most updated Florida electrical continuing education content and you can contact an instructor by clicking on the “Question or Comment” button inside your course.

The Florida packages are discounted until August 24th, 2016, so to receive the discounted package price pay for the completed package by August 24th, 2016. All package courses must be completed and then paid for at the same time to receive the package discount. At payment you can select to have your certificates of completion emailed directly to you.

Step 2: Check CE Hours.

JADE Learning reports to the Florida Division of Professions, Electrical Contractors’ Licensing Board (ECLB) every business day. You will receive an email notifying you that JADE Learning has reported your 14 hours of Florida electrical continuing education to the Florida ECLB. You can check to see that your hours have posted on the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation website.

 Step 3: Renew Electrical Contractors License.

Florida beach

Take your hours now so you will have time to visit a beach this summer – just like this one.

When all of your 14 hours of electrical CE for Florida have been posted, you are ready to renew your Florida Electrical Contractors license. You can renew your license online on the Florida ECLB website. The renewal fee for Certified Electrical Contractors is $300. The fee for renewing a Registered Electrical Contractors license is $125. Make sure you have completed these 3 easy steps to renew your Florida Electrical Contractors license by August 31st, 2016, so you will not have to pay the $50 late fee.

Get started on your Florida electrical continuing education today! You can log in to your JADE Learning account or register a free account and satisfy your Florida electrical continuing education requirements.

Posted in 2014 NEC, Electrical Licensing, JADE Learning Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Single Family Dwelling Calculation, Optional Method.

If you are preparing to take an electrical licensing exam, you will need to know how to calculate the feeder or service load for a single family dwelling. Refer to section 220.82(A)&(B) in the 2014 National Electrical Code (NEC). Here is a sample problem. Use the optional calculation to find the load on the following single family dwelling:

2800 sq. ft.

14 kW range

3 kW water heater

5 kW clothes dryer

1.5 kW dishwasher

15 kW central heat

29 amp, 240 volt air conditioning

 

Step 1:      

Multiply the sq. ft. area by 3 VA per sq. ft.   2800 sq. ft. x 3 VA =8,400 VA.  VA = volt-amperes.

220.82(B)(1).

 

Step 2:

Add in 1500 VA for each 2-wire, 20-amp small-appliance branch circuit and the laundry circuit. 1500 VA x 3 = 4500 VA.

220.82(B)(2).

 

Step 3:

Add in the appliances at nameplate value.

220.82(B)(3).

Range                             14,000 VA

Water heater                   3,000 VA

Clothes dryer                  5,000 VA

Dishwasher                     1,500 VA

 

Step 4:

Add all appliance loads together.

220.82(B).

Total = 36,400 VA

 

Step 5:

Take the first 10kW at 100%.   10,000 VA

Take the remainder (26,400 VA) at 40%. 10,560 VA

220.82(B).

 

Step 6:

Add the two values from Step 5 together to find the general load: 10,000 VA + 10,560 VA = 20,560 VA.

220.82(B).

 

Step 7:

Compare the heating load to the AC load and take the larger of the two loads. 220.82(C).

AC load at 100%. 29 amps x 240 volts = 6,960 VA

Heat at 65%.  15,000 VA x .65 = 9,750 VA (largest load).

220.82(C)(4).

 

Step 8:

Add the general load to the largest of the AC or heating load.

General load = 20,560 VA

Heating load = 9,750 VA

Total = 30,310 VA

220.82(A)

 

Step 9:

Divide the load in VA by the voltage. 30,310 VA ÷ 240 volts = 126 amps.

 

To sign up for an online exam prep course that will help you prepare to take an electrical license exam, go to http://www.jadelearning.com/jadelearning/exam-prep/vle. The course gives you unlimited access to all of JADE Learning’s exam prep questions, including single family dwelling, multifamily dwelling, ampacity, motors, box fill, and neutral calculations. Also included are sections on math and theory and the best way to find answers to test questions in the National Electrical Code (NEC) index.

Posted in 2014 NEC, Calculations, Electrical Exam Prep, Electrical Licensing, Service Equipment Tagged with: , , , ,
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