Feeders Part 2: Overcurrent Protection

The general rule in 215.3 is that a feeder overcurrent device shall have a rating not less than the noncontinuous load plus 125% of any continuous loads supplied by the feeder. Unless permitted for specific applications, such as motor circuits, the rating of the feeder overcurrent device is selected as close as practical to the allowable ampacity of the conductor. This allows the overcurrent device to protect the conductor from overheating due to overloads, as well as from ground-faults and short-circuits. However, the allowable ampacity of a conductor will seldom exactly match one of the standard ratings for fuses or inverse time circuit breakers in 240.6.

feeder-overcurrent-protection-blog-2-options-revised-2

Conductors must be protected against overcurrent in accordance with 240.4.


 

For example, the allowable ampacity of a 500 kcmil THWN aluminum conductor in Table 310.15(B)(16) is 310 amps. The ampacity of the conductor falls in between the standard overcurrent device ratings of 300 amps and 350 amps in section 240.6. Section 240.4(B) allows the next higher standard overcurrent device rating to be used as long as the standard rating does not exceed 800 amps. So, a 350-amp overcurrent device can be used to protect the conductor provided the noncontinuous load plus 125% of the continuous load does not exceed the conductor ampacity of 310 amps.

With large feeders where conductors are often connected in parallel, selecting the rating for the feeder overcurrent device is not as simple. Assuming there are not more than 3 current-carrying conductors in a raceway and the ambient temperature is 86oF (30oC), the allowable ampacity of three 500 kcmil THWN aluminum conductors connected in parallel is, 310 amps X 3 = 930 amps. The ampacity of the feeder conductors falls between the standard overcurrent device ratings of 800 amps and 1000 amps in 240.6. The next higher rating (1000 amps) cannot be used to protect the conductors because it is over the 800-amp limit set in 240.4(B), but an 800-amp rated overcurrent device may not be large enough for the load served.

For example, if the feeder supplies 400 amperes of continuous load and 400 amperes of noncontinuous load, the feeder overcurrent device must be rated not less than the 400 amps of noncontinuous load plus 125% of the 400 amps of continuous load.

400 amps of continuous load X 125% = 500 amps

500 amps + 400 amps noncontinuous load = 900 amps

A minimum overcurrent device rating of 900 amps is required, but 900 amps is not one of the standard ratings listed in 240.6.

What are the options?

1.One option is to change to a conductor with an allowable ampacity of at least 1000 amps and use a standard 1000-amp overcurrent device.  The allowable ampacity of a 600 kcmil THWN aluminum conductor in Table 310.15(B)(16) is 340 amps. The ampacity of three 600 kcmil conductors in parallel is 340 amps X 3 = 1020 amps. A 1000-amp rated overcurrent device can now be used to protect the feeder.

2. A second option is to use a nonstandard rated fuse or inverse time circuit breaker rated not less than the 900 amps required for the overcurrent device and not more than the 930 amps allowed by the conductor ampacity. Section 240.6 specifically permits the use of fuses or inverse time circuit breakers with nonstandard ampere ratings, but fuses or circuit breakers with non-standard ratings may not be readily available.

non-standard-rated-overcurrent-devices

900 amps is not a standard rating for an overcurrent device.


3. Exception No.1 to 215.3 offers a third option that would allow an 800-amp overcurrent device to be used at 100% of its rating, but only if the entire assembly including the overcurrent device(s) protecting the feeder(s) is listed for operation at 100% of its rating. Standard overcurrent devices, panelboards and switchgear are not listed for operation at 100% of their nameplate rating so this would likely require special ordering the equipment.

Any one of the three options above provide an acceptable level of overcurrent protection for general applications. Selecting an overcurrent protective device for specific conductor applications, such as a motor feeder, is a topic for another day. Power your career by learning more about overcurrent protection and the electrical code at JadeLearning.com.

Posted in 2014 NEC, Ampacity, Calculations, Conductors, Electrical Exam Prep, Feeders, Wiring Tagged with: , , , , ,

Feeders Part 1: What is a Feeder?

Author: Dennis Bordeaux

Illustration: Ivan Torres

In order to understand what a feeder is, it is best to start with what a feeder is not.

The conductors between the utility service point and the service disconnecting means are service conductors, not feeder conductors. Special service conductor rules apply because these conductors do not have short-circuit or ground-fault protection other than what is provided on the primary side of the utility transformer. Service conductors are not feeders.

Branch circuits are not feeders. A branch circuit is defined as, the circuit conductors between the final overcurrent device protecting the circuit and the outlet(s). Even the conductors for a circuit rated at 1000-amps is a branch circuit if the conductors are on the load side of the final branch circuit overcurrent device. The conductors on the load side of the final branch circuit overcurrent device are branch circuit conductors, not feeder conductors, no matter how large the circuit rating.

So, feeder conductors are conductors that are not service conductors and not branch circuit conductors. All circuit conductors between the load side of the service equipment and the line side of the final branch circuit overcurrent device are feeder conductors. The definition of a feeder also includes the conductors from the source of a separately derived system or other non-utility power supply source and the final branch circuit overcurrent device.

A Type SER cable between a 200-amp residential service disconnect and a subpanel is a feeder. The conductors between an 800-amp circuit breaker and a fused branch circuit disconnect supplying a single motor are also feeder conductors. So are the conductors between a standby generator and an emergency transfer switch. Although the overcurrent protection rules  for these different feeders vary depending on the load(s) supplied, overcurrent protection is typically provided at the supply end of the feeder.

The conductors between the secondary side of a 480-volt/208-volt transformer and the secondary-side overcurrent device are feeder conductors as well, but are not considered to be protected by the transformer circuit primary overcurrent device.

feeders-part1

Circuit conductors between the service point and the final branch-circuit overcurrent device.

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­______________

 

Prior to the installation of feeder conductors, the authority having jurisdiction may require a feeder diagram. A feeder diagram should include the total calculated load on the feeder and any demand factors used in sizing the feeder conductors. The size and type of feeder conductors, as well as the rating of the feeder overcurrent protective devices, should also be included with the feeder diagram.

A typical electrical system may have many types of feeders supplying many different types of loads. Feeders supplying a combination of continuous and noncontinuous loads, motor feeders, outside feeders or feeders to separate buildings are often included on a feeder diagram. In many cases there may be feeders from more than one voltage system on the same premises. DC system feeders may also be present.

riser-diagram-feeders-part-1

   A typical feeder diagram.

________________

 

Where feeders supplied from different voltage systems are present, each ungrounded conductor must be identified by phase or line and system at all termination, connection, and splice points. Identification of ungrounded AC system conductors may be by color coding, marking tape, tagging, or other approved means. Ungrounded feeder conductors supplied by a DC system must be identified by one of the methods listed in 215.12(C)(2). The color red is permitted to be used to identify an ungrounded positive polarity conductor and the color black is permitted to identify an ungrounded negative polarity conductor.

feeders-part-1-dc-identification

215.12(C)(2) Direct-Current Feeder Identification Methods.

With the exception of high-leg systems and isolated power systems, the NEC does not require specific colors to identify ungrounded AC conductors. The NEC mandates the use of the color orange to identify the high-leg of a 4-wire delta-connected system where the mid-point of one phase winding is grounded (110.15). If a high-leg system is present on the same premises with a 480-volt system, the common practice of identifying 480-volt feeder conductors using the colors brown, orange, and yellow may need to be adjusted. Marking tape, tagging or other approved means of feeder identification may be required to distinguish the different feeder voltages.

js-12

Typical 480-Volt AC Feeder Identification

Grounded feeder conductors if present, including grounded DC system conductors, must be identified in accordance with 200.6. Where grounded conductors of different voltage systems are installed in the same enclosure or raceway, each grounded conductor must be identified by system.

The feeder identification method used is required to be posted at each feeder panelboard or documented and readily available to those who will service the electrical system. Using a standard feeder identification method throughout the premises wiring system allows a qualified person to quickly identify the phase and voltage of the feeder conductors at all termination or splice points after the installation is completed.

Want to know more? Log into your JADE Learning account or register a free account and begin taking online electrical classes to satisfy you continuing education hours.

 

 

 

Posted in 2014 NEC, Conductor Identification, Conductors, Equipment, Feeders, Marking and Labeling Tagged with: , , , , , , , ,

Utah License Renewal: Electricians Renew in November!

The 16 Hour Renewal Package for Utah is online for all Utah licensed electricians to take for their Utah continuing education requirement. Utah electricians are required to have all 16 hours of electrical continuing education reported to the Utah Division of Occupational & Professional Licensing (DOPL) by November 30, 2016.

continuing education Utah

Sign up for the 16 Hour Renewal Package for Utah

Utah electrical licensees are required to have a total of 16 hours of Utah electrical continuing education each renewal cycle. Twelve of the 16 hours have to be Core credit, and the remaining four hours can be Professional credit. Another option available to satisfy Utah electrical continuing education requirements is for all 16 hours to be taken as Core credit.

The 16 Hour Renewal Package for Utah electricians expires on November 15, 2016. To take advantage of the discounted package price, Utah licensed electricians will need to complete and pay for the 16 hour renewal package before November 15, 2016. The courses in the Utah electrical continuing education package include:

Code Calculations (2014 NEC) will cover single family and multi-family dwelling calculations like lighting loads and general loads. Overcurrent Protection (2014 NEC) will discuss key sections of Article 240 which includes overcurrent protection for panelboards, motors, and appliances. Residential Wiring (2014 NEC) covers the requirements in the 2014 NEC for installing electrical systems in dwelling units. These three electrical continuing education courses will give you the 16 hours that you need for Utah license renewal.

Utah license renewal

Choose the Utah state flag at: www.jadelearning.com

Follow these 3 easy steps for Utah license renewal by November 30th, 2016:

Step 1: Complete Online Electrical Continuing Education.

Complete the 16 Hour Renewal Package for Utah online at any time day or night and on any device. The JADE Learning electrical continuing education courses can be completed on a laptop, smartphone, computer, or a tablet. To satisfy your Utah electrical continuing education requirements log in to your JADE Learning account or register a free account. The Utah electrical license renewal package is discounted at $169 until November 15, 2016. To receive the discounted price, complete and then pay for the three package courses at the same time. 

Step 2: Check CE Hours.

Wait for the electrical continuing education hours to be reported to the Utah Division of Professional Licensing. JADE Learning will report continuing education hours to the state online through the DOPL reporting website. Email notifications will be sent by JADE Learning to licensees once the hours have been reported to Utah DOPL. The reported continuing education hours should post to Utah’s DOPL site within a few days. 

Renew License Utah

Renew your Utah electrical license now.

Step 3: Renew Electrical License.

Submit the Utah license renewal form and fee online. The required fee to renew an active Utah electrical license is $63. Make sure to renew by the November 30th, 2016, deadline to keep an active electrical license. Check the status of an electrical license on the Utah DOPL license lookup webpage.

Get started today! You can log in to your JADE Learning account or register a free account and begin taking online electrical courses to fulfill your Utah electrical continuing education requirements.

Posted in 2014 NEC, Electrical Licensing, State Requirements Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

210.23(A)(1)&(2) Permissible Loads, Multiple-Outlet Branch Circuits.

Author:  Dennis Bordeaux

Illustration:  Ivan Torres

A multiple-outlet branch circuit is a branch circuit that supplies two or more outlets. With the exception of the required small appliance, laundry, and bathroom receptacle circuits in dwelling units, those outlets may be a combination of lighting outlets for luminaires, receptacle outlets for cord and plug connected utilization equipment not fastened in place (portable appliances) and or outlets supplying utilization equipment that is fastened in place. The load on the branch circuit is never permitted to exceed the ampere rating of the branch circuit, but simply adding up the nameplate rating of the utilization equipment does not guarantee code compliance.

The rating of any one cord-and-plug connected utilization equipment which is not fastened in place cannot be more than 80% of the branch-circuit rating. For example, a cord and plug connected commercial coffee maker is connected to a receptacle on a multiple-outlet 20 amp branch circuit. Since the coffee maker is not fastened in place it can be rated up to 80% of the branch circuit, or 16 amps.

The total rating of all utilization equipment that is fastened in place (other than luminaires) is not permitted to exceed 50% of the rating of a branch circuit that also supplies lighting and or receptacle outlets for other loads. In other words, the load for the utilization equipment that is fastened in place is limited to a maximum of 10 amps on a 20-amp rated branch circuit supplying a combination of lighting and or receptacle outlets for portable appliances. It is easy to exceed this limitation.

Permissible loads

210.23(A)(1)&(2) Permissible Loads, Multiple-Outlet Branch Circuits.

For example, a 120-volt, 20-amp branch circuit in an employee breakroom supplies a wall mounted water cooler with a nameplate rating of 3 amps, a fastened in place ice machine rated at 8 amps, and a duplex receptacle for a portable microwave. The total rating of the equipment that is fastened in place is 11 amps (3A + 8A = 11A). This exceeds 50% of the rating of the branch circuit. At least one of the loads needs to be connected to a different branch circuit.

In this example, a simple solution would be to connect the duplex receptacle for the portable microwave to a different branch circuit. The 50% limitation only applies if the branch circuit supplies a combination of utilization equipment fastened in place plus lighting outlets and/or receptacles for cord-and-plug equipment that are not fastened in place. Since both the water cooler and the ice machine are fastened in place, the connected load on the 20-amp branch-circuit is not limited to 10 amps if no other outlets are connected to the branch circuit.

Learn more about permissible loads today! Log into your JADE Learning account or register a free account and begin taking online electrical classes to satisfy you continuing education hours.

Posted in 2014 NEC, Ampacity, Branch Circuits, Calculations, Equipment, Wiring Tagged with: , , , ,

How to Get CE Credits: Best Continuing Education to Renew Your Oregon Electric License

Oregon General Supervising Electricians (S) and Limited Supervising Electricians (PS) have a 24-hour Oregon electrical continuing education requirement that has to be satisfied by Saturday, October 1st, 2016. The state of Oregon Building Codes Division requires the 24 hours of Oregon electrical continuing education hours to cover 12 hours of Code Change, 4 hours of Oregon Rule and Law (OESC), and the last 8 hours can be Code Related or Code Change.

Oregon electrician license renewal

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The best continuing education for Oregon General Supervising Electricians and Limited Supervising Electricians is presented by JADE Learning. The 24 Hour Renewal Package for S and PS Licensees includes:

The Oregon Supervising Electrical license renewal package is discounted at $219 until September 21st, 2016. To receive the discounted price, the package needs to be completed and paid for by September 21st, 2016.

Oregon Electrical CE Class

Earn your CE hours with the Oregon 24 Hour Renewal Package

3 easy steps to renew your Oregon electrical supervising license:

Step 1: Complete JADE Learning’s 24 Hour CE Package.

Complete the 24 Hour Renewal Package for S and PS Licensees online, at any time. Continuing education provider JADE Learning offers courses that can be completed using a smartphone, tablet, laptop, or computer. You can work on the courses at your own pace – log in and out at any time, and your work will be saved. You can register a free account or log in to your JADE Learning account any time – day or night. After you complete all four courses in the package, pay for them altogether at the end to receive the $50 package discount. The package deal expires on September 21st, 2016, so the courses have to be completed and paid for by then to receive the discount.

Step 2: Check the state of Oregon Building Codes Division Electrical CE Hours.

Your Oregon electrical continuing education hours will be submitted to the board every business day. JADE Learning typically reports to the Oregon Building Codes Division (BCD) two times per week, but when there is a deadline approaching, JADE Learning reports hours to Oregon every business day. After the hours have been reported, JADE Learning sends an email notification alerting you that your hours have been submitted to the Oregon BCD. You can check online to see that your hours have posted on the state of Oregon Building Codes Division License Holder Search webpage.

Step 3: Renew Oregon Electrician License Online.

Oregon Electrical CE Classes

Take your Oregon electrical CE hours now, so you will have time to explore the outdoors this fall.

You are ready to renew once all of your hours have posted to the Oregon BCD website. You can submit your Oregon Supervising Electrician license renewal online. The cost to renew an Oregon Supervising Electrician license is $100. Make sure you renew your Oregon electric license by October 1st, 2016, to keep an active supervising license.

Get started now! You can log in to your JADE Learning account or register a free account and fulfill your Oregon electrical continuing education requirements with the best electrical continuing education classes!

Posted in 2014 NEC, Electrical Licensing, JADE Learning Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Renew your Florida Electrical Contractors License in 3 Easy Steps with Online CE Classes

Florida Mailer

Earn your hours with the Florida 14 hour package

JADE Learning is offering the 14 Hour Renewal Package for Florida Electrical Contractors online for the August 31st, 2016 renewal deadline. All licensed electrical contractors in Florida are required to complete 14 hours of continuing education to renew a Florida electrical contractor license.

ECLB Florida is requiring an additional 1 hour Florida Laws and Rules course to be included in the 14 hours of continuing education for Florida. The 14 hours of Florida electrical continuing education must consist of 7 hours technical, 1 hour laws and rules, 1 hour workers’ compensation, 1 hour business practices, 1 hour workplace safety, 1 hour Florida building advanced module, and the last 2 hours can be on any of the categories above and will count as 2 hours general credit to renew a Florida electrical contractor license. Two hours of false alarm prevention is required for all alarm contractors and electrical contractors who engage in alarm work. Take the best continuing education package with JADE Learning that includes all of the required courses as well as the new Laws and Rules requirement.

The following Florida CE class packages are available to take online at any time:

14 Hour Renewal Package for Florida Electrical Contractors

  • Residential Wiring (2014 NEC) (7-hours Technical)
  • Florida Business Statutes (1-hour Business)
  • Installation Checklists (2-hours Technical)
  • Florida Laws and Rules (1-hour Laws/Rules)
  • OSHA Electrical Safety Work Practices (1-hour Safety)
  • 2014 Utility-Interactive PV Systems (1-hour Advanced)
  • Workers Compensation-2016 (1-hour Workers’ Compensation)

14 Hour Alarm Renewal Package for Florida

  • Residential Wiring (2014 NEC) (7-hours Technical)
  • Florida Business Statutes (1-hour Business)
  • False Alarm Awareness (2-hours False Alarm)
  • Florida Laws and Rules (1-hour Laws/Rules)
  • OSHA Electrical Safety Work Practices (1-hour Safety)
  • 2014 Utility-Interactive PV Systems (1-hour Advanced)
  • Workers Compensation-2016 (1-hour Workers’ Compensation). 

 

Follow these 3 easy steps to renew your Florida Electrical Contractors license:

laptop with JADE Learning

You can access www.Jade1.com from any device

Step 1: Complete Online CE Class.

Complete the 14 Hour Renewal Package for Florida Electrical Contractors online at any time and on any device. The JADE Learning classes can be finished using a computer, laptop, tablet, or smartphone. You can access your JADE Learning account or register a free account at any time, day or night and work on the courses over the next few weeks or take the courses back-to-back in 14 hours. You will be presented with the most updated Florida electrical continuing education content and you can contact an instructor by clicking on the “Question or Comment” button inside your course.

The Florida packages are discounted until August 24th, 2016, so to receive the discounted package price pay for the completed package by August 24th, 2016. All package courses must be completed and then paid for at the same time to receive the package discount. At payment you can select to have your certificates of completion emailed directly to you.

Step 2: Check CE Hours.

JADE Learning reports to the Florida Division of Professions, Electrical Contractors’ Licensing Board (ECLB) every business day. You will receive an email notifying you that JADE Learning has reported your 14 hours of Florida electrical continuing education to the Florida ECLB. You can check to see that your hours have posted on the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation website.

 Step 3: Renew Electrical Contractors License.

Florida beach

Take your hours now so you will have time to visit a beach this summer – just like this one.

When all of your 14 hours of electrical CE for Florida have been posted, you are ready to renew your Florida Electrical Contractors license. You can renew your license online on the Florida ECLB website. The renewal fee for Certified Electrical Contractors is $300. The fee for renewing a Registered Electrical Contractors license is $125. Make sure you have completed these 3 easy steps to renew your Florida Electrical Contractors license by August 31st, 2016, so you will not have to pay the $50 late fee.

Get started on your Florida electrical continuing education today! You can log in to your JADE Learning account or register a free account and satisfy your Florida electrical continuing education requirements.

Posted in 2014 NEC, Electrical Licensing, JADE Learning Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Single Family Dwelling Calculation, Optional Method.

If you are preparing to take an electrical licensing exam, you will need to know how to calculate the feeder or service load for a single family dwelling. Refer to section 220.82(A)&(B) in the 2014 National Electrical Code (NEC). Here is a sample problem. Use the optional calculation to find the load on the following single family dwelling:

2800 sq. ft.

14 kW range

3 kW water heater

5 kW clothes dryer

1.5 kW dishwasher

15 kW central heat

29 amp, 240 volt air conditioning

 

Step 1:      

Multiply the sq. ft. area by 3 VA per sq. ft.   2800 sq. ft. x 3 VA =8,400 VA.  VA = volt-amperes.

220.82(B)(1).

 

Step 2:

Add in 1500 VA for each 2-wire, 20-amp small-appliance branch circuit and the laundry circuit. 1500 VA x 3 = 4500 VA.

220.82(B)(2).

 

Step 3:

Add in the appliances at nameplate value.

220.82(B)(3).

Range                             14,000 VA

Water heater                   3,000 VA

Clothes dryer                  5,000 VA

Dishwasher                     1,500 VA

 

Step 4:

Add all appliance loads together.

220.82(B).

Total = 36,400 VA

 

Step 5:

Take the first 10kW at 100%.   10,000 VA

Take the remainder (26,400 VA) at 40%. 10,560 VA

220.82(B).

 

Step 6:

Add the two values from Step 5 together to find the general load: 10,000 VA + 10,560 VA = 20,560 VA.

220.82(B).

 

Step 7:

Compare the heating load to the AC load and take the larger of the two loads. 220.82(C).

AC load at 100%. 29 amps x 240 volts = 6,960 VA

Heat at 65%.  15,000 VA x .65 = 9,750 VA (largest load).

220.82(C)(4).

 

Step 8:

Add the general load to the largest of the AC or heating load.

General load = 20,560 VA

Heating load = 9,750 VA

Total = 30,310 VA

220.82(A)

 

Step 9:

Divide the load in VA by the voltage. 30,310 VA ÷ 240 volts = 126 amps.

 

To sign up for an online exam prep course that will help you prepare to take an electrical license exam, go to http://www.jadelearning.com/jadelearning/exam-prep/vle. The course gives you unlimited access to all of JADE Learning’s exam prep questions, including single family dwelling, multifamily dwelling, ampacity, motors, box fill, and neutral calculations. Also included are sections on math and theory and the best way to find answers to test questions in the National Electrical Code (NEC) index.

Posted in 2014 NEC, Calculations, Electrical Exam Prep, Electrical Licensing, Service Equipment Tagged with: , , , ,

Securing and Supporting Cables and Raceways

Guest Contributor: Jim Egan

This post reviews the securing and supporting requirements for MC Cable, NM Cable, PVC conduit, and EMT. A summary Table of the requirements is included.

The requirements for securing and supporting are similar in intent, but there are differences. Securing is done by installing a mechanical means of attachment to the cable and attaching it to a stationary structural member so the cable does not move. This will prevent the cable or conduit from becoming loose and pulling away from a box or fitting. Support requires a mechanical means to prevent the cable from sagging or drooping which may cause damage to the cable and create a hazard. A cable may remain loose while its support is maintained.

Throughout Chapter 3 in the NEC, Wiring Methods and Materials, the .30 section is reserved for securing and supporting. For example, 330.30, 334.30, 352.30, 358.30 are all sections about securing and supporting.

  

330.30 Securing and Supporting Metal-Clad Cable: Type MC

Securing MC Cable.

Securing MC Cable.

MC cable must be secured at intervals not exceeding 6 ft. Cables that contain conductors no larger than No. 10 AWG must be secured within 12 inches of every box, cabinet, fitting, or other cable termination.

MC cable must be supported every 6 ft. MC cable is considered supported when run through metal or wooden framing members.

MC cables may be unsupported when (1) fished through concealed spaces in finished buildings, (2) when not more than 6 ft. in length from the last point of cable support to the point of connection to a luminaire or other equipment, and (3) when not more than 3 ft. from the last point of support where flexibility is necessary for equipment that requires movement after installation.

 

334.30 Securing and Supporting Non Metallic Sheathed Cable: Type NM, NMC, and NMS

NM cable must be supported and secured every 4 ½ ft. and within 12 inches of every outlet box, junction box, cabinet, or fitting.

Secure and support.

Secure and support.

Where nonmetallic cable is installed horizontally through holes or notches in framing members, it is considered supported and not required to be secured. Also, where nonmetallic cable is fished within walls, it does not require support or fastening. In dwelling units within an accessible ceiling, support for the cable can be 4 ½ ft. from the last point of support to a connection to a luminaire or other piece of electrical equipment.

 

352.30 Securing and Supporting Rigid Polyvinyl Chloride Conduit: Type PVC

Expansion fittings for PVC conduit.

Expansion fittings for PVC conduit.

PVC conduit must be secured within 3 ft. of each outlet box, junction box, device box, conduit body, or other conduit termination. PVC must be supported every 3 ft. for trade sizes ½ inch through 1 inch. The support distance increases as the conduit size gets larger. For example, 2 inch PVC conduit can be supported every 5 ft; 6 inch PVC conduit can be supported every 8 ft. See Table 352.30.

PVC conduit is subject to thermal expansion or contraction. When the outside temperature gets hotter, PVC conduit will expand, pushing on fittings, boxes, and straps. When the temperature cools down, PVC conduit will contract, causing the conduit to separate or pull apart from fittings, boxes, and straps. For example, if a 100 ft. run of PVC was installed when it was 30°F outside, and in the summer the outside temperature reached 90°F, that is a 60°F change, and the conduit would expand 2.43 inches. See Table 352.44.

Expansion fittings are required for PVC conduit to allow the conduit to move back and forth inside the expansion fitting. Without the expansion fittings installed, the conductors inside the conduit can be damaged. Since a temperature change of only 20°F can cause the conduit to expand or contract more than 1 inch, expansion fittings are necessary to protect the conductors inside the conduit.

 

358.30 Securing and Supporting Electrical Metallic Tubing: Type EMT

Supporting EMT.

Supporting EMT.

EMT must be secured at least every 10 ft. and within 3 ft. of every outlet box, junction box, device box, cabinet, conduit body, or other termination.

An exception allows EMT to be fastened up to 5 ft. apart if structural members like joists or rafters do not permit fastening every 3 ft. A second exception allows EMT to be fished in concealed spaces without support in unbroken lengths without a coupling.

Horizontal runs of EMT are considered supported if installed through openings in framing members that are spaced not more than 10 ft. apart.

 

 

Wiring Material Secure and Support
330.30 Metal-Clad Cable: Type MC Shall be secured within 12 inches of a box, cabinet, or fitting and supported every 6 feet thereafter.
334.30 Nonmetallic-Sheathed Cable: Types NM, NMC, and NMS Shall be secured and supported within 12 inches of a box and every 4 ½ feet thereafter. The cable is considered to be supported in horizontal installations through framing members.
352.30 Rigid Polyvinyl Chloride Conduit: Type PVC Shall be securely fastened within 3 feet of a box, conduit body, or other point of termination. Support shall comply with Table 352.30, based on the size of the conduit.
358.30 Electrical Metallic Tubing: Type EMT Shall be secured and fastened within 3 feet of a box, conduit body, or other point of termination and within every 10 feet thereafter.

Learn more today! You can log in to your JADE Learning account or register a free account and begin taking online electrical courses to fulfill your  electrical continuing education requirements.

Posted in 2014 NEC, Cables and Raceways, Securing and Supporting Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Montana Electrician Continuing Education in 3 Easy Steps

Montana Electrical Continuing Education

Earn your hours with the Montana 16 Hour Renewal Package

The license renewal deadline for Montana Journeyman electricians, Residential electricians, and Master electricians is July 15th, 2016. All Montana licensed electricians must have the required 16 hours reported to the Montana Department of Labor and Industry State Electrical Board before the deadline in order to renew a Montana electrician license. A total of 16 hours is required and 8 hours must be on the current National Electrical Code. The other 8 hours can be an industry related course or another National Electrical Code course.

The best continuing education package available online is JADE Learning’s 16 Hour Renewal Package for Montana Electricians. The online package includes the following Montana licensed electrician continuing education courses:

The 2014 NEC Changes Part 2 course will cover the second half of the most important updates to the 2014 National Electrical Code and fulfills 8 hours of NEC electrician course credits. The Residential Wiring (2014 NEC) course is an industry related course that covers the requirements in the 2014 NEC for installing electrical systems in dwelling units. Together these Montana electrician continuing education courses will give you the 16 hours that you need to renew your Montana electrician license.

Follow these 3 easy steps to renew your Montana Journeyman electrician, Residential electrician, or Master electrician license for the 2016 renewal deadline:

Montana Electrical Continuing Education

Choose the Montana State flag on www.Jade1.com

Step 1: Continuing Education.

Montana Electrical Continuing Education

You can access www.Jade1.com from any device

Complete the 16 Hour Renewal Package for Montana Electricians. All JADE Learning courses can be accessed online from any device. You can use a smartphone, tablet, laptop, or computer to complete the courses. You can log in to your JADE Learning account or register a free account at any time. The Montana electrical license renewal package is discounted at $159, until July 8th, 2016, so to receive the discounted price, the package needs to be completed and paid for by July 8th, 2016. Package courses must be completed and then paid for at the same time in order to receive the package discount.

Step 2: Check CE Hours.

Wait for your Montana electrical continuing education hours to be reported to the Montana State Electrical Board. JADE Learning reports hours to Montana Department of Labor and Industry every business day. You will receive an email notification from JADE Learning when your courses are reported to the electrical board. Then go online to check and see that your hours have posted on the Montana License Lookup webpage.

Step 3: Renew License.

When all of your hours are posted, you are ready to renew your Montana electrical license. You can submit your Montana electrical license renewal form online. If you have trouble renewing your license, there is an instructions document available online to assist you.

Montana Electrician Continuing Education

Take your hours now so you will have time to spend with your family this summer – just like these elk.

In addition to submitting the renewal form, you must also submit the renewal fee. The renewal fee for active Journeyman, Residential, and Master Licensees is $200. Make sure all payments and forms are submitted to the Montana State Electrical Board by July 15th, 2016, to avoid the $200 late fee.

Get started today! You can log in to your JADE Learning account or register a free account and begin taking online electrical courses to fulfill your Montana electrical continuing education requirements.

Posted in 2014 NEC, Electrical Licensing, JADE Learning Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

JADE Learning’s Featured Employee….Meet Amy Bonilla

Amy Bonilla at City of Oaks.

Amy Bonilla after running City of Oaks in Raleigh.

Amy Bonilla is the General Manager of JADE Learning and has worked at the company for over 10 years.  She is originally a Cheesehead, born and raised in Wisconsin; she loves cheese, the Packers, the Badgers, and the Great Lakes.  Amy moved to Raleigh in 2006 to get some sunshine and warm weather and begin working at JADE Learning.  She has worked as an instructional designer on courses such as “Introduction to Photovoltaic Systems”, “Residential Electrical Inspections”, “Advanced Access Control“, “Introduction to Network Security Cameras“, “Electrical Safety Now“, and “Lockout/Tagout“.Here’s a recent Q&A with Amy:

Q: What is your favorite summer activity?

A: Swimming. I always wanted and never got a pool growing up (remember, I lived in Wisconsin). I love swimming in the pool, a lake, an ocean…I enjoy being in and around the water.

Q: What is your favorite color?

A: According to my son, it would be pink or purple. It really depends on what the item is (Clothes? Shoes? Flowers? Website button? Font?) but if I had to pick an absolute favorite, I would go with blue.

Q: Where would you travel to if given the opportunity to go anywhere?

A: Hawaii and Disney World. I’d also really like to visit places all over the United States that I haven’t had a chance to see yet, like the Grand Canyon, Cape Cod, San Francisco, Anchorage…

Q: What is your favorite quote?

A: I have a lot of these. One of my favorites is in Italian: “Non è mai l’ultimo”. Roughly translates to “It is never the last”, and I find it to be enduringly hopeful.

Tell us something about yourself that would surprise us.

A: I am not that surprising of a person, but this one usually shocks people. I currently live in an internet free home (although I think those days are numbered)!  We have access through our smartphones but no WIFI or hard-wired internet connection. I am old-fashioned and really like my kids to play outside and use their imaginations.

 

Electrical License Renewal Site JADE Learning

JADE Learning Logo

Q: What is something that you are looking forward to?

A: Watching my children learn and grow. Each day is a new adventure filled with possibility and that is really an amazing thing. I wish childhood would slow down some though!

Tell us some facts about you that most people don’t know.

A: I really enjoy running, but I am one of those slow people that most people don’t consider to be runners. When I’m training for an event, people ask about my time or pace or stats, and that’s not what motivates me as a runner. I like the challenge of running a set distance, training and pushing my body, and the solitude of being outside in nature. I run an event to train and finish the event, not to beat anyone or set any records. This reminds me of another great quote: “The race is long, and in the end it’s only with yourself.” My race isn’t about pace.

Q: What are your hopes for the electrical industry?

A: I am aligning myself with Mike Rowe here and hoping we can find a way to increase interest and respect in trades. It takes all kind of people and jobs to make a country great, and not everyone needs a master’s degree or should be a lawyer or a doctor. We shouldn’t send a one-size fits all message to our youth. “Learning how to weld, or how to run electric, or how to install a toilet – these skills can and often do lead to fulfilling careers, balanced lives, and better than average pay. Even if you don’t spend the rest of your life working in the trades, there’s simply no downside to learning a skill. None whatsoever. Kids who are floundering today should be encouraged to hit the reset button and start learning a useful skill as soon as possible.”Mike Rowe. Lifelong learning is invaluable, but it can take many shapes. We need people who can do the jobs that need people!

If you want to learn more about JADE Learning, be sure to connect with Amy Bonilla on LinkedIn.

Posted in Featured Employee, JADE Learning Tagged with: , , , ,

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